PETITION BY CANE GROWERS SEEKING MINIMUM GUARANTEED PRICE

POINT OF ORDER  – PETITION BY CANE GROWERS SEEKING MINIMUM GUARANTEED PRICE

Madam Speaker I rise on a Point of Order seeking clarification on  why I was not allowed to move a petition that I submitted to your good self as required under Standing Order 37, on Tuesday 25th April.

I respectfully submit the fact that I was not allowed to move a motion for a petition to be referred to the relevant standing committee is violation of the Standing Order 37 of Parliament, as well as breach of Section 72 of the 2013 Constitution.

The provision on presentation of petitions is extremely clear. A petition must be in conformity to the Constitution and must not create ill-will and hostility.

The Petition that was submitted to you Madam Speaker is about cane growers seeking parliamentary intervention to help them achieve a minimum guaranteed price for a tonne of cane. The petition, signed by 404 registered cane growers throughout the Western Division cane belt from Rakiraki to Sigatoka, doesn’t violate this provision, nor any other provision of the Constitution and the Standing Orders.

Madam Speaker, the merits and de-merits of this or any petition can only be determined after it is moved in Parliament.

Standing Order 37(5) and 37(6) lays out the procedure of what happens when a petition is moved.

There is nothing that overrules it once the Speaker decides a petition is in order. It is the Speaker’s call because a petition is sent to the Speaker. I am surprised that you have not made any decision, based on your previous rulings of 8th July 2015 and again on 23 rd March 2017.

No aspect of it clashes with Bills No. 19 and 20. Bills 19 and 20 before the parliamentary standing committee on economic affairs do not address the issue of implementing a minimum guaranteed cane price. It is all about amending the Sugar Industry Act.

Neither has the issue been raised and voted upon in any motion, previous petition or question that was asked in the last six months.

In any case your rulings of 8 th July 2015 and 23 rd March 2017 make it extremely clear why petitions are important. On 23 rd March you re-iterated your ruling and I quote: –

“The right of citizens to petition their Parliament and the power of Parliament to deal with petition is an ancient right and was affirmed by the House of Commons in 1669. It is a fundamental right of the citizen, which is preserved in our Standing Orders. It is the only means by which individuals can directly place grievances before the Parliament on matters which the Government has jurisdiction”. – Unquote

Madam Speaker, Section 72(b) of the Constitution says Parliament must facilitate public participation in the legislative and other processes of Parliament and its committees. Section 72 of the Constitution relates to Petitions, public access and participation.

Denial of a petition, more so, if it complies with Standing Order 37 is a breach of the Constitution.

In any case, Government under Standing Order 37 has the right to reply to the petition and also vote either for and against it.

Essentially Madam Speaker, this Petition is in order and I once again respectfully submit that it should be moved in Parliament without delay, based on your previous rulings and in conformity to both Standing Order 37 and Section 72 of the 2013 Constitution.

Any delay in determining the future of the petition (when there is no need to since it conforms to every provision required for acceptance and moving of a petition), will deny the cane growers who signed the petition their right to be heard by Parliament and constitute a breach of Section 72 (b) of the Constitution.

It concerns their livelihood and future before the start of the crushing season.

I await your ruling Madam Speaker.